Facebook After Hours: Apess Attempt to Educate

A Facebook Friend of William Apess posts on their  Facebook wall what they consider a highly intellectual post at 8:53pm on a Wednesday in response to today’s political climate. William Apess’ friend, (a colleague he had for a few classes at a pre-dominantly upper class university) Bob writes:

“May God instill the same strength and might in the young children locked in cages as He did in the brave Mary Rowlandson. Although their fights may be quite different, Mary Rowlandson is an outstanding image of what a survivor of captivity and maintainer of Grace looks like.
I pray they find peace in the same ways Mary was able to do so while still holding a respectable image of the Indian Peoples.”

William Apess sees the post nearly minutes after his distant Facebook friend debuts his words. He is unable to simply look past it and keep scrolling. For a moment he is triggered, and decides to “quickly” respond in a respectable yet firm manner, here is what he writes:

Comment by William Apess at 12:02am

“Hello dear “friend” of mine, if that is even what you could still call yourself after the disgusting, ridiculous comparison you have made of a colonizer to innocent indigenous children to this land. While it is not my job to educate you on the history of this country, as the good person I am, I find it in my heart to pose a few learning questions for you today, in hopes you will re-evaluate the nature of your post. Is context not the most important thing to consider when making such bold posts? When discussing the “fight” of Rowlandson, should you not also discuss the fight of countless indigenous peoples who died, suffered at the hands of starvation, and whose women were raped and abandoned all because of a Puritan religion in which justified colonizers acts in doing so?

I pray to God too. I pray that in an era of foreseeable revolution, privileged men on Facebook will look to other revolutionary figures to inspire change, rather than a woman who was most notable for not detailing indigenous people as drunks.

If you have any questions, please feel free to not message me as it is not my job to educate people on their failure to acknowledge the ways in which they continue to disrespect the history and lives of the indigenous people of this land.”

 

-Angelica Costilla-Mancha

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3 thoughts on “Facebook After Hours: Apess Attempt to Educate

  1. This is a literature of power because it applies a contemporary lens to a classical text and the result is a compelling reflection on two authors. It is inquisitive without being accusing or overly harsh. It is as much analysis as it is parody.

    Like

  2. I believe that this creative piece is a literature of power because it moved me as a reader. I appreciated the creativity with using a Facebook post and modernizing the situation.

    Like

  3. Angelica the most original idea of your post is the point you make about how Rowlandson’s narrative excludes the true nature of what indigenous people had to go through at the same time. By not allowing Rowlandson’s narrative to dismiss this important lack of information you are calling attention to the fact that history is generally incomplete when it is retold which is important because this is a key way of participating in the erasure of peoples and important events. I would say that one suggestion would be to perhaps consider adding a response from the original poster in response to Apess to show the possible dialogue between the different perspectives.

    Diana Lara

    Like

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