Beauty in Darkest Places

Caspar David Friedrich painting, The Abby in the Oakwood, (1808-1810) depicts the wickedness of twisted trees in a clearing. There is a darkness that sweeps through the bottom half of the image as if making sure to shroud objects. Objects that from closer looking, seem like marked graves . In between the image stands a ruin of some sort as if a building had stood there many years ago. These trees and the ruin stand tall and extend to the top of the image but as the image goes up there is a clearing of color. The darkness subsides and light can be seen for there is beauty in darkness. From darkness comes a beauty that can never been seen unless the transition from light to dark is seen, the in-between that serves as that transition shows that there is difference in what they do. It is a change that envelopes the human soul and twists it just like the trees to change their nature, hopefully for the better, or at least become someone or something new. For you see, change is beautiful. For example in the poem “We Are Seven” by William Wordsworth tells the painful story of a child recounting the death of her siblings. She states that:

The first that died was sister Jane;

In bed she moaning lay,

Till God released her of her pain;

And then she went away
She seems to be retelling the stories in an effort to explain her situation of being in a gravesite and slowly the reader discovers more about the human soul. Jane may have died, a painting of sorrow and sadness with every death that comes. However in this tragedy lives a greater good, a freedom that comes to liberate when things are too rough. She was released of pain and yearning to actually want to live but the soul lives on. An enlightened ideal of wanting there to always be some smudge of good anywhere. The darkest situations always bring forth light even if they seem slightly fixed.
-Alexis Blanco
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2 thoughts on “Beauty in Darkest Places

  1. The most original idea in your blog post is “From darkness comes a beauty that can never been seen unless the transition from light to dark is seen, the in-between that serves as that transition shows that there is difference in what they do.” To make your post stronger I suggest you explore the connection between the soul and nature. You mention both in the post but they are not connected and it would be very interesting to explore such a sensitive topic.

    Extra Credit p. 2 8/10

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  2. The most original idea was “She seems to be retelling the stories in an effort to explain her situation of being in a gravesite and slowly the reader discovers more about the human soul.” I think that interesting and powerful. Improvement would be elaborate on the soul and how nature connects to it and if it does at all?

    Rahma Kohin
    EC – 16/25

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