Ballads and Romance

I have chosen to discuss Théodore Gericault (French, 1791–1824) Evening: Landscape with an Aqueduct, 1818. This painting exemplifies so many things about the time period of romanticism. The painting is very telling of the romantic period and how it has both a positive and negative light.  On the left side of the painting there is a sunsetting light that is showing the sweet aspect of the romantic period and on the right side near the rocky mountains is a sharp darkness which reveals the negative and ugly side of the romantic period. I think the darkness can be related to the pain of the romantic period and what the pain meant to society.

This painting embodies the fantastical elements in the romanic period based on the castle that is shown just beneath the mountain.The symbolism that is evident within this painting is truly mimicking the symbolism that is in  the poem “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”.

In the poem, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” there is a lot of nature based symbolism. For example,

“And I had done a hellish thing,
And it would work ’em woe:
For all averred, I had killed the bird
That made the breeze to blow.”
This darkness in the poem is symbolized in the painting and shows how the killing of the bird relates to the darkness of the romantic period and how it can be somewhat evil to live in. The dark clouds that hover over the mountain relates to the line, “that made the breeze to blow” shows the power and strength of the romance that is embedded in the society at the time.

 

-Anthony Miller

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One thought on “Ballads and Romance

  1. The most original idea in your blog post is “The symbolism that is evident within this painting is truly mimicking the symbolism that is in the poem ‘The Rime of the Ancient Mariner'”. To make this blog post stronger I suggest expanding in detail on what the castle looks like. You say in the blog that it represents the fantastical elements of the romantic period but I am not sure how it is fantastical.

    Extra Credit 3/10

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