Name calling and corporate slavery

The second cartoon for today’s analysis reminds me of a much older story, one we are all probably familiar with. Moses! This is the story of Moses and the Israelites. It depicts a people with many social conventions and rights and yet no food to put on the table, who cannot decide what is better – to have food and be in slavery or to have much less food and be free to do what you like. The cartoon labels the starving and hardworking laborer as being in slavery and the slave as being free because of this. And, in fact, out in the desert the watermelons in Egypt sure taste better because you forget the grueling labor and harsh punishments which, of course, are the subject of today’s examination. The purpose of the cartoon is simple and ham handed and has thus been explained.

Equianos narrative beginning on page 56 of the assigned reading, however, takes a different approach 

Joshua Jolly 

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2 thoughts on “Name calling and corporate slavery

  1. The strongest point in this blog is: “The cartoon labels the starving and hardworking laborer as being in slavery and the slave as being free because of this.” I think it’s interesting (and worthwhile) to question what is slavery? What are the degrees of slavery? What sort of entities enslave people? However, I was unclear as to whether you were claiming this cartoon was a satire on misconceptions of slavery or not. My main suggestion for this blog would just be to stress the importance of returning to the text in order to draw from it evidence to support and enhance your claims.

    Extra Credit: 23/25

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  2. The main point I see is, “The second cartoon for today’s analysis reminds me of a much older story, one we are all probably familiar with. Moses!” because the cartoon does indeed look like it is depicting that old story. However, I would have included a bit more on Equiano only because you mention him in one sentence and then end the post. It’s a bit vague to put only a one sentence reference but it should be easy to find correlating information if you look closely at the reading.

    extra credit 23/25

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