Bacon and the Modern Day

Sir Francis Bacon has been one of the most influential figures in 17th British colonization of north America. Bacon was a royalist, philosopher, statesman, scientist and even published author. His work, From The New Atlantis, focused on the marriage of theology and science. These ideas of the marriage between science and religion was the basis for the creation of the Royal Society. Bacon writes about this connection in From The New Atlantis. Bacon shows the necessity for this connection to reach his version of a perfect society. He states that “God bless thee, my son, and god bless this relationship give thee leave to publish it for the good of other nations” (Bacon 1627). To Bacon, a utopian society is theological and scientific. Science is the explanation for God’s actions. 17th century British colonist culture revolved around their religious faith.when comparing these colonists to modern day american, it’s apparent that the colonist wanted religion to be mixed in with government. This mixing of religion and government is also found in england during the time when Bacon wrote. The idea that government needs to be married with religion and science is not found in modern day America. In fact the cultural importance of a person’s faith has faded over the last 400 years. This fade is due inpart to the lessened importance that religion plays into the average American’s cultural identity.

Bacon’s ideas on how science affects goverment rings true even in the modern today. His thoughts on how important scientific development is  on the fabric of society was a major influence for the creation of the royal society. Bacon wrote that science is the basis for state power and economic growth; also, that it benefits the social progression and technological development.
-Conor Morgan

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s