Divide of classes; dividing love

In John Dryden’s “The Indian Emperour, or the Conquest of Mexico,” is the precursor to the repetitious cycle of division of classes, and inability to embark on relationships based on a difference of ethnicity, nationality, race, and specifically religion.  Dryden, essentially, captures the Romeo and Juliet-esque tragic love story that is occurring amidst the two empires -that of the Aztecs and the imperialists.  In imagining what this theatrical portrayal must have been like for the onlookers, it can be concluded that although many spectators where there for social status purposes, some must have been able to have taken some sort of introspective experience from the play.

In addition, the twist is that Dryden’s attempt at exposing such a political and nationalistic divide, should have resonated even louder within the confines of that theater.  The theater, consisting of a diversity that has been broken up into categories, literally based on their seating.

The whole spectacle rings true still today.  There are publishers of every sort: singers, poets, songwriters, bloggers, playwrights, filmmakers and directors, attempting to raise an awareness towards an important social issue.  For example, social media outlets of today, whether it be the news, or facebook, or twitter, carries a plethora of information intended to show us the breakdown that is occurring within the nationalistic part of our society.  The lack of solidarity, and unity is similar to what Dryden’s point of view is.  We have seen footage after footage, of people yelling others for speaking a language other than English, thus exposing the xenophobia that many feel.

Dryden’s work is a work of modernity, campaigning for the notion to rid of old ways and ideals that only seem to stifle the growth of a nation.  Similarly, that is the case with today.  Ironically, we seem to be going backwards.  Love and the ability to combine beliefes does not seem to be the resolution at the moment.

-Maricela Martinez

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3 thoughts on “Divide of classes; dividing love

  1. The most interesting idea presented by Maricela was that: “In addition, the twist is that Dryden’s attempt at exposing such a political and nationalistic divide, should have resonated even louder within the confines of that theater. The theater, consisting of a diversity that has been broken up into categories, literally based on their seating.” I like this because she is identifying how expertly Dryden used the theatre to convey his propaganda, which is unlike anything I have read so far. To improve this post, I would just cite parts in the play, since I’m a big fan of that.

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  2. I think you do a good job here in creating a mirror between Dryden’s time and our own. I think your original argument revolves around how Dryden is trying to represent some kind of divide on a large scale, though there in the audience lays a divide based on seating. To add to this I think it would have been beneficial to add a quote where you best think a divide was portrayed within the play.

    Extra Credit 5/5/2017

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  3. The most original idea in you blog post is “is the precursor to the repetitious cycle of division of classes, and inability to embark on relationships based on a difference of ethnicity, nationality, race, and specifically religion.” To make your post stronger I suggest you focus on a form of media that is widely used today and compare it, with specific examples, to Drydens play. After all that was the main source of media in his day.

    Extra Credit 23/25

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